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I always find it interesting how some people carry on until they are so old.

The guy next to us was working - not a job he loved, very manual - until he was 72. He died 6 months later. That's hardly a way to go is it.

I don't think they were desperate for money either.

Just seems odd to me.

 

 

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Sometimes, I find it hard to follow your posts ippy!  

Perhaps look for some work involving colour later in life?

I know a few people in this neighbourhood who have done that.

Work themselves hard all their life, quit their job at a late stage, and then quickly fade out.

Very sad.

 

Seems some people don't know what to do with themselves when work is taken out of their life.

I can't imagine I'd be one of them.

My dad has done well since retiring at 60 and is very active. Hope I can do that.

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Edit....Jelly just posted the same thing but...The vast majority of people don't know what to do with themselves after they retire. Many just wither away and die. Especially, dudes.

 

I'm well adjusted to doing nothing all day so..I'll be just fine.. :wave:

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I think people who were 100% into their job with it totally consuming their life find it more difficult to adjust. (Tubby, be careful there!) ;)

 

The key is to have something you that you love doing and do lots of it, and keep active. Sounds like a mad/good "problem" to have.

 

My parents too are both still active, even if less mobile than they used to be.

 

Money aside, the idea of working hard until I'm 70 65 60 is......... less than appealing!

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I always find it interesting how some people carry on until they are so old.

The guy next to us was working - not a job he loved, very manual - until he was 72. He died 6 months later. That's hardly a way to go is it.

I don't think they were desperate for money either.

Just seems odd to me.

 

Having reached 70 and still being fit enough to work, the person you mention would have had a normal life expectancy of I guess another 15 years. I guess Rik Mayall had plenty put away but he died at 56. You don't get to choose when.

 

Working hard to save for a retirement you may die before or soon into or be too sick to enjoy goes against carpe diem, living for the day. In simple terms, the younger you are, the more you can enjoy the money you've got. I reckon any overseas travel done when you're young is worth loads more than when you are old. Loads loads more.

 

Personally, I reckon the key word is scouser's "working hard". Ideally, society would create lots of opportunities for older people to reduce the amount they work without losing out via tax, pension, or benefits, which can mean the only realistic options are working full time or not working at all. Every government in the world seems to be in massive debt and retirement ages going up everywhere, so working at 70 is probably going to be the norm, not the exception. The cost of twenty years' of 100% retirement, including an increasing amount of care, in a first world country is going to be well beyond most folks and governments.

 

On a personal level, we've got ourselves a mortgage and big family, so retirement is not getting any nearer for me.

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I always find it interesting how some people carry on until they are so old.

The guy next to us was working - not a job he loved, very manual - until he was 72. He died 6 months later. That's hardly a way to go is it.

I don't think they were desperate for money either.

Just seems odd to me.

 

Having reached 70 and still being fit enough to work, the person you mention would have had a normal life expectancy of I guess another 15 years. I guess Rik Mayall had plenty put away but he died at 56. You don't get to choose when.

 

Working hard to save for a retirement you may die before or soon into or be too sick to enjoy goes against carpe diem, living for the day. In simple terms, the younger you are, the more you can enjoy the money you've got. I reckon any overseas travel done when you're young is worth loads more than when you are old. Loads loads more.

 

Personally, I reckon the key word is scouser's "working hard". Ideally, society would create lots of opportunities for older people to reduce the amount they work without losing out via tax, pension, or benefits, which can mean the only realistic options are working full time or not working at all. Every government in the world seems to be in massive debt and retirement ages going up everywhere, so working at 70 is probably going to be the norm, not the exception. The cost of twenty years' of 100% retirement, including an increasing amount of care, in a first world country is going to be well beyond most folks and governments.

 

On a personal level, we've got ourselves a mortgage and big family, so retirement is not getting any nearer for me.

 

Back home you can see it everywhere. People with nice homes, new vehicles and plenty of expensive toys like fifth wheel trailers, big boats, and so on sitting in the driveway. They have just decided that paying the interest on the loans is their goal...and forgetting about paying off the principle. No saving, no retirement plan...living for the moment. Many of my friends are like this. I just shake my head but, they aren't necessarily wrong for looking at it like that though. I certainly couldn't do it.

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There's probably a lot of worry and unease behind the scenes there; with some of them anyway.

 

I know a couple back in the UK. They "live life for now", have a lovely house, two luxury cars, the works... but they owe an absolute ton of money to a whole raft of companies. Effectively none of it is theirs.

 

They seem ever so happy to outsiders, but secretly have massive episodes, arguments and stress over it all in private. I know coz the male half admitted as such from time to time. From the outside though, it's all perfect. And lets face it, come the future the problems are just going to grow.

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I think people who were 100% into their job with it totally consuming their life find it more difficult to adjust. (Tubby, be careful there!) ;)

 

The key is to have something you that you love doing and do lots of it, and keep active. Sounds like a mad/good "problem" to have.

 

My parents too are both still active, even if less mobile than they used to be.

 

Money aside, the idea of working hard until I'm 70 65 60 is......... less than appealing!

 

:lol: haha! I get so blinded by doing what's right that I always put me last!!

 

On that note....I'm off home :D

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Loads of folks have mortgages and have seen the value of their home soar, so debt for housing can be a fantastic investment, a good, a so-so, a bad, or a disaster. Its all a timing play. Housing is a need, so it's crap that there is so much speculation and boom and bust with it, and that people are forced into playing the game. Speculation should be limited to less important things.

 

For me, buying toys like jet skis or even flash cars on credit does not equal living for today. That's just what advertisers and sellers want you to believe.

 

If you want to travel, do something active like skiing, do something involving motor skills like playing a musical instrument, do something involving memory like studying a foreign language or something else, the best time to do it is not going to be 65 or over. Traditional oldies hobbies like knitting, growing prize leeks, and making a ship in a bottle might be okay though!

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Muzukashii desu ne.

 

About the ships in bottles though. Do they make the ship first and then somehow by magic create a bottle around it?

Or do they go through what must be a very precise process of creating the ship inside the bottle.

Either way, it seems like it must be jolly difficult.

 

Furthermore, and I suppose this might be the biggest question... why do people make ships in bottles?

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I'd love to finish feeling I need to earn and just have tons of time to go round taking photos. I suppose I could at least try to make a few pennies off that, though don't know what the realistic chances are. And wouldn't want that to be any kind of pressure either. In summary, would like to be able to travel and take photos!

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Furthermore, and I suppose this might be the biggest question... why do people make ships in bottles?

 

Because they can.

 

It's like mountaineering, except for old people.

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Hoping to retire in 3 years at 50 as soon as the kids are old enough to fend for themselves then I think just travel and do volunteer work to keep occupied just need to have enough investments to support us.

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What does "earn when you retire" mean?

 

Having income producing investments.

 

I'm looking at retiring at around 55. My wife is 7 years younger than me and I expect her to work till 55 as well so there'll be 7 years I can live it up whilst she supports me. Looking forward to it.

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For me planning to retire around 55 so I still have some years left to be able to travel and do lots of different things.

My wife I hope she will decide to retire around the same age.

 

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Im well up for dying on the job. Well, not ON the job. But at home while im still in my working life.

Work gives me a routine. Im kinda chaotic, lazy and insular. Its not that i particularly love work, but i know that if left to my own devices i will slip into awful habits. I remember distinctly this program that was on back in the UK (before or after Japan, i forget?) I dont remember anything about it to be honest except for this one image:

 

It was a 70 year old dude (or thereabouts) who just sort of slipped from the common weal. He was living in a house filled with garbage bags of rubbish. He was perfectly content with his life of shit.

 

Ah! found it! Life of grime! Dunno if its the Trebus episode or another one. Anyways, it burned into my retina even then. I know its my destiny. Not for the lofty and serious reasons that Trebus has, but because im a pig who cant honestly take care of his most basic communal functions unless he feels the pokey eye of social approbation burning into his back. Theres going to come a point when i genuinely stop caring about what other people think. And that bothers me. At least if i have to go to work i maintain some kind of compact with society to not be too ****ing weird and self indulgent. Take that away from me and its an irretrievable slide into wretchedness. And by then, i might as well be dead*.

 

*which would be fine to be honest. Id enjoy the experience of being invisible. I possibly need an inheritance though :)

 

ETA: Destiny:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=trBxaRO7t_Y

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