Jump to content
SnowJapan Community
  • Sign Up
Sign in to follow this  
ryguyten

Only have 2 days to ski, where would you go?

Recommended Posts

Yuzawa/Kagura wins for convenience. Are you not prepared to spend a night or two at the resort and just want to get a few turns in for the experience of skiing in Japan? Go to Kagura.

 

If you want steepish tree runs and powder and you're accustomed to Colorado-scale, Kagura will not give you that. The upper lifts offer short runs that are not particularly steep. (And if there's wind, they close all upper lifts and you're stuck on green pistes). If you have the energy to catch an early bus/train from Tokyo and the time to spend a night in the mountains, you can probably get two really good days of skiing in at Nozawa or somewhere in Hakuba. Hell, I dunno, I just like steep trees and powder and I think Kagura's way over-rated but taking the Shinkansen out there is definitely fast and hassle-free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think ger is saying steepish tree runs in combination with powder, but I would say that Kagura has both. Nozawa and Hakuba definatley have steeper, but I would say some of the tree runs I have done at Kagura would be at least steepish even when the top lift is closed. That said I do like Nozawa a lot also and usually save Kagura for when all the lifts are running.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nozawa ain't quite as convenient to get to as Kagura though.

For such a short time, I'm sure Kagura wuld be good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No powder at kagura?! :confused:
snow yes but steeps no. plus the runs are short, plus if it's windy yer done. but yeah, kagura gets incredible amounts of snow. what about naeba for trees and pow? I heard it beats kagura from a buddy who avoids piste whenever possible. don't know much about the place, myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think ger is saying steepish tree runs in combination with powder, but I would say that Kagura has both. Nozawa and Hakuba definatley have steeper, but I would say some of the tree runs I have done at Kagura would be at least steepish even when the top lift is closed. That said I do like Nozawa a lot also and usually save Kagura for when all the lifts are running.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are Nozawa and Hakuba too far to day trip and get there before resort opens or close to first chair? Since we will be in Tokyo, I just am not sure of we want to switch hotels and stay part of the time at a resort.

 

I think ger is saying steepish tree runs in combination with powder, but I would say that Kagura has both. Nozawa and Hakuba definatley have steeper, but I would say some of the tree runs I have done at Kagura would be at least steepish even when the top lift is closed. That said I do like Nozawa a lot also and usually save Kagura for when all the lifts are running.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah they are. You take a shink from Tokyo to Nagano station then u have a 2-2.5hr bus ride to resort.....you won't get there till about 10.30-11am......for me that's half a day wasted. Kagura you leave Tokyo station, 90 mins later ur at Yuzawa station transferring to a 20 min shuttle bus.....if there are no lines at the ticket desk or rope way it's possible to be on the snow for 8.45-9am. I've done it loads of times

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh and a wee tip.....when u book the tickets (which u can do online before u get here) they may tell u that u can't get the early train and give u one for mid morning, just take that anyway and smile......then get on the earliest train anyway.....it just means that you have to sit in the unreserved car. No one will check your ticket. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are press for time and hard up for some fun runs try Karuizawa Prince hotel ski park. It is 86 minutes from Tokyo station on the Nagano Shinkanse and 200 meters walking distance from the Karuizawa station. First lift opens at 8.00am to 5.00pm. Catch the Asama 557 6.28am from Tokyo and you will be there for the first lifts. When you pull in to Karuizawa station just look to your left and you will see the lifts. Its is the easiest and the best option to get to from Tokyo station. One train and you are there. I don,t know why SP has not got it listed on it list of resorts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Karuizawa is pants. The OP wants some powder and tree runs.....avoid karuizawa. It is easy to get to, but a waste of ur 2 days IMO when there are much better mountains just easily accessible

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All this advice and some very bad. like Hakuba or Kugara for a day trip. Sure it has tree runs but the only one that allows is Cortina. all the others are patrolled and if caught will take your lift pass. Weather is another factor. In recent season the there has been periods 10 days straight without any snow in January and February. So why go to far off places if you are going to get the same groomed runs and crowds. Who want to spend 3 to 4 hours on public transport carting your gear get to a ski area and be disappointed. I did say for fun runs!! so settle down with the I KNOW BEST ATiTUDE.!! Yes go to these place if there has been a good dump of snow but you will be hard up get any powder run after 10.00am at that time of the season if you don,t know the resorts. The person live in Colorado if you have not notice which has very good snow. He is not coming from the UK or Australia where the worst Japan condition are far better. He says he is staying in Tokyo but where ? Some people seem to forget how big Tokyo is. I prefer not to lead people on with possibilities or dreams but with the best option with facts about the worst case available. The only person who seem to read the this item correctly is Onehunga.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
All this advice and some very bad. like Hakuba or Kugara for a day trip. Sure it has tree runs but the only one that allows is Cortina. all the others are patrolled and if caught will take your lift pass.

I'm not sure about Kugara, but the similarly named Kagura are relatively relaxed on this point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it seems that I actually do know best.......Kagura was the resort I rode most in, mostly due to its ease to get to from Tokyo.....its 90 mins at most from Tokyo to Echigo Yuzawa, and then a further 20 mins by shuttle bus to the resort......someone must've been eating their carrots because the shuttle buses seem to coincide with the arrival of the shinkansens, which means that you don't need to hang around the station for too long before getting your bus to the slopes.

 

Karuizawa is a waste of time and energy......its you who are leading on people with possibilities and dreams.

 

As Pies said, Kagura's patrol do not yoink lift passes for ducking ropes or riding the trees, Kagura does get great snow and even if you are only riding the pistes, even Yeti would give Karuizawa a run for its money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol:

 

I've never been skiing at Karuizawa, but it does look diddy and I have heard it's much more about shopping than skiing.

 

Never been to Kugara either actually!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Biggen....I think the only person who said anything about Hakuba was me. And I only said it was "doable" but certainly not advisable. Seems to me everyone is pretty spot on except for that crazy, wacky Kokodoko fellow.... ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol:

 

I've never been skiing at Karuizawa, but it does look diddy and I have heard it's much more about shopping than skiing.

 

Never been to Kugara either actually!

 

Shopping of course is a great pastime while the other half is skiing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

sjf2019l.png

About SnowJapan

SnowJapan.com is the independent guide to skiing and snowboarding in Japan and has been online since 1999.

SnowJapan.com covers the whole of Japan. We are here to introduce the world to unbiased, honest and detailed information about winter sports in Japan. We publish exclusive and in-depth and daily content throughout the winter season and we add new functionality and content to the site every year.

We are not here to promote any specific destinations or resorts, or to sell our readers any kind of products or services. We are not a travel agency and we do not own any ski resorts, ski schools, accommodations or other related businesses.

×