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New Question : What makes Japan riding different?


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I have not been much at all in Japan, having only boarded in NZ and Europe, but all you veterens - what makes Japan so good, if indeed it is that good??? And how is the experience different to other countries in your experience. Just interesting to know...I will be living in Japan next year, so I want to prepare myself!

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xxx, do you know "ska ska club"???

 

it's a japanese ska-punk band, i like them!!

 

but last year was it the hate, allways when i got in to hard core riding i heard "your everything, your everything, your everything la la laaa la la la laaaaaa....."

(the la la la's where in japanese and i couldn't understand them.)

but that song was so ugly!!!!!!!!!!!!

HATE!!!!!!

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Hey guys (and gals), I don't really have an answer to this question, because my first time to Japan is the end of January. But I need an answer! I still have to convince my hubby that we need to hit the slopes while we're there. He says that it's just sking- and we go to Colorado every year, so why waste our time there, since it's all the same... (idiot, I know)

 

SO, how can I convince my hubby that sking Japan would be an experience of modern Japanese culture? And therefore time-worthy?

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Huge amounts of untouched powder snow and a unique cultural experience. Corny, but great! Looking at the skiing alone: if you want extreme steeps, cliffs and couloirs your better of in Europe or the Rockies, but if you don't want to get up at 5.30am to be the first in line so that you can get a patch of powder then Japan is the place. The larger ski areas are comparible to US/Canadian mountains but nothing like the huge French and Swiss areas. If you want it a bit more lively at night you need to hit the bigger resorts, ie Niseko, Yuzawa and Hakuba (or bring loads of friends). These all have great slopes too. Just try not to visit over the New Year as this is peak season and packed out. The week after would be much better!

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The smell is indeed different - there's often a smell of snowbikes and burning plastic rubbish - verrrr nice.

 

Talking of canned beverages, I like the milk tea - it reminds me of the taste of rice pudding.

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 Quote:
Originally posted by cal:
Cans of hot coffee!
On that subject - anyone actually like those things? They are just sooooooooo sweeet its unreal.


there are some coffees without sugar!!
just black, no milk no sugar!
(but i allways used to choose the wrong...)
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This is very interesting for me because I will be coming to Japan in February for the first time. Interesting to hear all these opinions and thoughts.

 

Thank you!

 

lin

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 Quote:
Originally posted by riddles:
Being surrounded by 99.9% Japanese people.
(Good thing)!


Good to see such nice sentiments on a web site made by non-Japanese with the admirable intention of letting more non-Japanese know about winter sports in Japan.

As if gaijin don't have a hard enough time without other "better than thou" or territorial gaijin making snide comments.

I used to go to house/techno clubs a lot in the main cities. Especially in Osaka, it would often be that the only person in a club who wouldn't respond when spoken to was the "I'm so cool" gaijin who was doubtlessly ego-tripping on having escaped the lumpen gaijin bar scene and found some trendy Japanese mates. It was as if the presence of other gaijin was shattering their little dream.

With the yen going through the floor, it's getting cheaper for you overseas readers to give Japan a try. A tour party of 500 Americans hit Hakuba last spring and the resort is aiming for more this year, as ever pushing the "we did the Olympics" line. If you ask me, people with experience of skiing/boarding in other countries can only be a positive influence on Japanese resorts. I would imagine that the resorts are far more willing to listen to people coming specially from overseas than to day-tripping foreigners living locally.
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