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grungy-gonads

The best fish in the world

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I have just been watching Broadcaster on telly (a slow weekend) and they were doing a piece on fish and how young kids aren't eating as much as "they should be".

 

Of course there was a panel of (about) 657 celebs and announcers lined up all looking very proper in the studio after the report and one of the 89 year old "I've got an opinion and I'm right" dudes came up with the comment that translated basically as:

 

"....There's no other country in the world with as many kinds of fish and with as delicious fish as Japan....".

 

I found that to be one of those sweeping proud-type statements that you hear often, and not being into fish really I wouldn't know.

 

So, true?

 

(Of course, they finished up the report and section by imploring us to all eat more fish).

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I think it's true.

We can have fresh fine fish all over Japan, from Kyusyu to Hokkaido.(Okinawa fish is different, they are very colourful...)

Moreover, good fish comes to Japan from all over the world and consumed here.

 

I had really good Sushi in Denver several years ago, I thought they imported fish from Seattle or somewhere in ths US and I was so impressed by their fish quality.

But the true story is... they import fish from Fukuoka everyday:

 

Quote:
Sushi Den was born in 1985 when Toshi, who had been a chef in Tokyo and Los Angeles, and Yasu, who had been a chef in London, came to Denver to start their own restaurant. Toshi is the heart and the soul of Sushi Den. Although soft-spoken, he communicates with the senses. Sushi Den is a feast for the eyes as well as the palette, and is the gathering place of Denver's cutting edge.

 

Not one to rest on his laurels, Toshi continuously raises the bar and sets the standard for high quality sushi, not only in Denver but throughout the United States. The adherence to quality at Sushi Den has never wavered in 20 years, a remarkable accomplishment for any restaurant. The Zagat survey rates Sushi Den as one of the most prestigious Sushi and Japanese restaurants in the United States. Sushi Den clearly stands out from the rest of the competitors and continuously sets the standard.

Along with an incredibly dedicated and talented staff of 85 in Denver and a staff of 15 in Japan, the success and talent behind Sushi Den lies in the three Kizaki brothers, Toshi, Yasu & Koichi, and Toshi's wife Michiko.

 

Koichi, the youngest brother, lives in Japan. Koichi makes a daily 4:00 AM trip to the fish market to select and purchase the finest and freshest fish for both restaurants. The fish is vacuumed packed with dry ice and flown from Japan to Denver arriving the same day.

 

Toshi is the creative force behind the true sushi dining experience at Sushi Den. He is the master chef in both Denver and Japan. Toshi also makes a daily 7:00 AM trip to Denver's Japanese fish market 6 days a week.

 

 

When I go to Fukuoka next time, probably in October, I'm going to check out Sushiden there. yummy

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The best fish is a live fish!! Keep em swimming in the ocean and off our plates thanks!

biggrin

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I love fish.

My kids do not (generally).

 

However.....in Japan....EVERYONE got a kick out of checking out the amazing variety of fish in the Fishmonger shops. You just don't get that here - it is all boring sterile little fillets of mystery fish.

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I do like having a nosy round the fish section just to see what weird and wonderful creatures are on the slab

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>(Of course, they finished up the report and section by imploring us to all eat more fish).<

 

Yep and Australia has the best coal in the world. We should all burn more coal.

 

More coal fired power stations please. thumbsup

 

From here

Japan, which consumes more than half the world's catch of the at-risk Atlantic bluefin tuna, has admitted overfishing, but blamed poor communication between its fishermen and denied accusations it had fished illegally. Last October it agreed to halve its catch of southern bluefin by about half to 3,000 tonnes a year over the next five years.

 

Delusional old farts.

 

 

 

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Originally Posted By: Mamabear
However.....in Japan....EVERYONE got a kick out of checking out the amazing variety of fish in the Fishmonger shops. You just don't get that here - it is all boring sterile little fillets of mystery fish.


Maybe on the West Coast MB, here on the East Coast we get a huge variety of seafood. It's likely due to the absence of estuaries that limit WA's fish species/'quality'. (Personally, reef fish are terrible to eat)

My family has a history as fishermen, two points, NEVER buy fillets because you get stale fish that wasn't previously sold; and, alway check out the eyes and prod the body with your finger - if the eyes are opaque and the fish soft, it's old catch.

As for the Japs having the best fish in the world - what a load of crap. Sure, if you count factory ships plundering the Earths marine environments then bringing it back to J-Land for consumption, but their own waters hold few commercial species due to over-fishing/pollution. I doubt the typical J-lander knows or cares about the facts.

As for a good fish - can't beat an esturary flathead or leather jacket. Deep sea - John Dory, plate-sized Snapper. It really depends how you cook it and what nationality cuisine you're doing, eh?

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Originally Posted By: crusty old man

"....There's no other country in the world that eats as much fish per capita and is responsible for overfishing and collapsing fish stocks as Japan....".




fixed it for him

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The Japanese love eating fish and so do I.

 

Shame we have to go to the coral reefs in Indonesia to get some good garoupas.

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are you sure its cod 2pints? Most chippies in the UK now don't sell cod as its too expensive due to overfishing. A lot will sell Whiting for their fish suppers, they just don't advertise that its not cod anymore

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Originally Posted By: SubZero
Originally Posted By: Mamabear
However.....in Japan....EVERYONE got a kick out of checking out the amazing variety of fish in the Fishmonger shops. You just don't get that here - it is all boring sterile little fillets of mystery fish.


Maybe on the West Coast MB, here on the East Coast we get a huge variety of seafood. It's likely due to the absence of estuaries that limit WA's fish species/'quality'. (Personally, reef fish are terrible to eat)

My family has a history as fishermen, two points, NEVER buy fillets because you get stale fish that wasn't previously sold; and, alway check out the eyes and prod the body with your finger - if the eyes are opaque and the fish soft, it's old catch.

As for the Japs having the best fish in the world - what a load of crap. Sure, if you count factory ships plundering the Earths marine environments then bringing it back to J-Land for consumption, but their own waters hold few commercial species due to over-fishing/pollution. I doubt the typical J-lander knows or cares about the facts.

As for a good fish - can't beat an esturary flathead or leather jacket. Deep sea - John Dory, plate-sized Snapper. It really depends how you cook it and what nationality cuisine you're doing, eh?


I totally agree SZ
The kinds of fish I've seen for sale in Japan (nicely wrapped in plastic) are the same type we use for bait to catch better fish.

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yes.... ssshhhhhhhhmokedddddddd.

 

Kippers are great. Smokes salmon needs a lot more smoke in my opinion.

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small snapper

king george whiting

travelling bream and ludderick fresh out of the net grilled on an open fire at the beach

flathead

 

freshly caught that day. of course.

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What about the humble Drummer (or rock black fish) Practically unavailable comercialy or difficult to catch, though easy to spear. A real treat and a staple diet in this house

thumbsup

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The only thing I ever managed to catch in the Swan River or off the rocks of the north mole was a cold, blowfish and the odd undersized little yellowtail. I gave that up when I was a kid.

 

Glad you Easterners manage to catch some nice fish though.

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i have never had a drummer..

 

they have fish over west mama.. lots of them.. lol..

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But really - fish that are hard to beat for eating -

 

1. Mangrove Jack

2. Medium size Spanish Mackeral ( 1 - 3 kg)

3. Red Emperor

4. Fresh ( like swimming less than 8 hours ago) Flathead

5. Pearl Perch ( Nanaguy)

 

And just because they are fun to drag out of the water - GTs - give them a taste of air and let them swim away.

 

But all the others - "I fillet and release"

 

And every time I pig out on fresh caught Mud crab - I think how fortunate I am compared to the "lucky" ppl of Hakodate who can get fresh King Crabs for $50 + kg

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Originally Posted By: kokodoko
i have never had a drummer..




Last Saturdays' catch'. An ugly fish but very good on the table. Better than snapper IMO, so long as they are not too big.
IMGP0001.jpg

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