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greg

SnowJapan Member
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4 Got that first like!

About greg

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    Australian
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    Australia
  1. Park riding in Niseko would be nothing to what you are used to in the US. I would go as far as to say that there isn't a park in Niseko (2-3 jump/tabletop, a couple of beginners rails etc). Also seems a long way to go. Spo much snow/powder makes maintaining parks a pain. Spend half in Hakuba and half in Hokkaido.
  2. I have a Burton FL board and bindings I still use. Circa late 90's. The bindings are kind of Frankenstein bindings now. Made up of all sorts of on the mountain repairs "that I will fix when I am back in town....."
  3. That's interesting, I hadn't considered the Diao yu's to come into things for the average folk until now.
  4. Being fit before you go helps....but sounds like you have pretty well got it covered. Glutamine can help with DOMS. You could always go old school hard core and drink bi carb soda before you go out (olympc road cyclists used to do it), it buffers lactic acid which causes DOMS, of course messing around with your blood PH is a good way to a heart attack. Best thing for DOMS is more exercise, You'll get TEA, temporary exercise analgaesia. I would just follow everyone elses advice, booze and bath.
  5. I saw the price myself a while ago and nearly fell off my seat. Having boarded Weiss when it had lifts running and cat skiing several years later I thought no one will pay that ridiculous amount. Having had time to think about it, i think it will do Ok. There are plenty of people who have the money on holidays who want "the experience". Niseko is far more crowded than it was 10 or even 5 years ago so the miles of untracked powder stories are rare at best. There is also the issue of percieved value, "if that is how much they are charging, thats how much it must be worth". Only time will tell but I believe plenty of cashed up families from China,Honk Kong and Malysia will be using the service. If it succeeds what is signals to me is Niseko really is becoming what a lot of people wanted. A major international resort with all the trappings (and often associated gouging). I'll leave it up to you guys as to whether that is good or bad or neither.
  6. Unless you intend to travel around just jump on a bus, whiteliner, goodsports etc. heaps easier (and cheaper)
  7. I have a Contour Roam Neck. Used it last season in Niseko. The base model doesn't have 60 fps which woul dbe nice for some slow mo but apart from that I am really happy with it. It sounds pretty weak but the Go Pro just looks stupid on top of your helmet. You kinda look like a tele tubbie (just a vanity issue not a technical one). Biggest thing I like about the contour is their one huge sliding button for on or off and thats it. With gloves or mits on it makes a huge difference. I seen a lot of unedited video (whick to be honest thats how most of it stays) for Go pros wheer the first thing you hear is "is it on". Even with remotes and wireless gizmos it still is more fooling around than with a simple sliding switch. The 3M mounts work well. It also comes with a small line/tether that you can fix to the camera and your helmet strap near your ear. If you lose your cameras then you have probably also just killed yourself so you wont be too concerned. I do like the Go Pros aswell. Foro ther sports where I dont wear gloves/mits and I can mount it wheer I can see the camera to check if it is on, I would probably get one.
  8. Love big boards. Not just for big powder days. When things get really tracked out, you can usually affored to take that oneone line a little wider into fresh stuff that is just out of the reach of smaller boards.
  9. Niseko put Japan on the map as a viable ski destination for Westerners. Many people try to be cool by staying on the fringes and avoiding anything mainstream. Niseko is now mainstream so people will bag it for the sake of it whether they have been there or not. Some people like to explore new hills all the time. I think thas great. Some poeple like to get to know a hill like the back of their hand and make the most of the conditions on a any particular day. There is no right answer except many people think there is... There are so many fantastic places to ski in Japan. Niesko is one of them.
  10. snow's good, food's good,accommodation's good, services are good, apres ski's good, kids facilitie's good, advertised and serviced well. For many it's just convenient.
  11. Hi mate, I don't know 100% but from the map on their web site it looks like they are located in Izumikyo. Thats about five odd minutes outside the main Hirafu village. Depending on what you want. It will be quieter, but you will be walking alot and relying heavily on the shuttle bus (especially in your gear). If you want easy access to everything I would suggest the main Hirafu Village, if you want things to be quieter then Izumikyo would be OK. Can someone else confirm their location?
  12. Plenty of reasonable places left mate, you'll find something. Just try lower down in the village.
  13. I would just ask you to think what you really intend to do? I know you have already stated it but you should really think about it. If you are going all the way to Japan what are you after? the groomed runs or the powder? You have recieved heaps of good advice on skis and it's all personal preference. Just pick something that will compliment your Japan experience. You may find you will spend more time in the powder than you expect!
  14. Probably wrong country for on slope shoppping. Someone with greater experiece may know otherwise.

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