Jump to content
SnowJapan Community
  • Sign Up

Blazer

SnowJapan Member
  • Content Count

    28
  • Joined

  • Last visited

    Never

Community Reputation

0 No 'likes' yet

About Blazer

  • Rank
    SJ'er with 10+ posts
  1. ollie, I don't agree that it's the same with all sports. In the vast majority of big money sports, ie. soccer, NFL, NBA, baseball, tennis, golf etc. the young prodigies are touted from a young age and brought up to make money from their talent. There isn't another Luis Figo out there not playing professional soccer in the big leagues, there isn't another Tiger Woods playing golf every other weekend on his local course. But I do agree that some other sports, probably due to the relatively low wages, don't attract the best so much. And snowboarding seems to be one of those sports where, thank God, many people do it for the love of it rather than the money or the glare of winning medals. Obviously, everyone would like to get paid for riding everyday, that would be awesome, but their is a difference between the pro riders who do the videos and races for appreciation by their peers, and those that just want nationwide acclaim.
  2. lin, They're somewhere other than the farcically corrupt, over commercialized, circus that is the Salt Lake Olympics. I would guess somewhere where they are pulling twice the air, with twice the style, of the 'medal' winners.
  3. Just want to have a say on this topic. Who cares who won because, as we all know, the world's best pipe riders weren't even there. Also, have you noticed how many Olympic related topics have appeared on this board which, 10 days ago, seemed to be full of people who didn't care about the games and weren't going to watch them?
  4. It is what you get when you cross attempted "phat air" with a "lip plant" landing. Fair play to the girl though, she pulled it off next time.
  5. I just wanted to share with you all what a great board park Kazawa Highlands has. It is almost on the border between Nagano and Gunma, but actually in Gunma. For 5,000 yen you can get a ticket from 7-11 which includes a good lunch and a drink with your days ticket. Parking is always free. Anyway, the board park they have is really well layed out. Anybody who went there last year: they have got rid of the half pipe and extended the jumps. There are rails and all kinds of jumps. Just to make the day even better, I saw a guy do a back flip off one of the jumps, and landed it twice! What a guy!!!!!!
  6. I got approached by someone at Iwatake, in Hakuba, to ask if I rode the pipe or the jumps. They were offereing one day instruction classes in either the pipe or the park (about 6,000 yen I think). Anyway, they offer these services every weekend and some other odd days. What I'm trying to get at is that they approached me, a gaijin, so there is probably a need there for English speaking instructors, because my Japanese is pretty basic. However, I'm sure that you would also need to have a pretty good level of Japanese to be hired. Anyway, good luck.
  7. I live near Kusatsu but have never been there, because I'm a boarder. I hear that it's good for skiers, but the lay out is pretty c#*p. Something about having to cross a big car park near the top?!? Also, not too long ago, 2 skiers died there when they skied through an area of poisonous gas. So don't go off piste, hey!!
  8. I'm an English teacher with about 3 lessons a day. What else am I supposed to do???
  9. I agree with Ocean on the seasons thing. Also, in relation to the seasons, why do the Japanese think that it's strange for Westerners not to drive 3 hours just to see the brown leaves on trees. Another gripe I have is why, when I ask my Japanese friends where a good place to visit is, do they tell me somewhere 3 hours away 'just because it has nice raamen'. I don't take day trips just to eat some food somewhere different. This link has potential, I could be here all day!!
  10. After every time I go riding I dry my board and apply quick wax. This takes about 20 minutes. Then I hot wax it after about 4 or 5 trips. I totally recommend getting your own stuff, because if you are prepared to put in a bit of time it will make your board last longer and ride better. It's convenient to get a shop to wax your board but you tend not to get it done as often as you should because of the cost. Go with your own gear doggy-style, it's better in the long run. (final thought, bear in mind that many Japanese electrical goods aren't compatible in other countries, if you are returning home soon)
  11. NoFakie, I have exactly the same problem trying to do the chin strap up with my gloves on. I think mine is the model down from yours because it doesn't have the ear covers. None the less, it still does a good job for me. And I don't look half as stupid as most of the other ones made me look!!
  12. I think reverendbuba says it perfectly. I'm a snowboard tech in Japan, and that's exactly how it should be said!!! I also think it's a good idea to use some of the quick wax after every trip. This takes next to no time and keeps your board from getting those horrible dry white patches over it. Then hot wax it after every 4 or 5 trips. Happy sliding
  13. Yeah, Yeah, I know. Snowboarding is like sex; 'You can't learn it from a book', but I just wondered if anyone has read or seen any good books about snowboarding. Let's face it, some of these books do have some good ideas and professional hints (re:snowboarding books / pornos??!) I've read one recently called 'The Illustrated guide to snowboarding' by Kevin Ryan, and it's got some really good stuff in it. I'd be interested to hear what you've all got to say.
  14. doggy-style, I recommend buying 'Snowboard Mapple' magazine which lists loads of ski resorts throughout Japan, and gives an easy to follow description of their half pipes and snow parks.
  15. Many of the helmets in Japan are OUTRAGEOUSLY expensive. I bought a relatively cheap Pro Tec helmet which has good ventilation and the all important clasp for your goggles! Even this, as one of the cheaper models, is now selling for about 11,000 yen!!!

sjf2019l.png

About SnowJapan

SnowJapan.com is the independent guide to skiing and snowboarding in Japan and has been online since 1999.

SnowJapan.com covers the whole of Japan. We are here to introduce the world to unbiased, honest and detailed information about winter sports in Japan. We publish exclusive and in-depth and daily content throughout the winter season and we add new functionality and content to the site every year.

We are not here to promote any specific destinations or resorts, or to sell our readers any kind of products or services. We are not a travel agency and we do not own any ski resorts, ski schools, accommodations or other related businesses.

×