Jump to content
SnowJapan Community
  • Sign Up
Sign in to follow this  
sez

Do onsen differ wildly in different areas?

Recommended Posts

....or are they much the same?

 

I suspect people who are mad into them might see all the differences, but for the person who is new to them.

 

For example, would the onsen in Yuzawa be very different to the onsen in Nozawa? Or Zao Onsen?

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of Nozawa's onsens are public and free to use. Very basic- though incredibly relaxing. These are generally different to the onsens in the Ryokans which tend to be quite luxurious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on what u mean by different.......sure they are all just baths full of hot water but for me, I always want a rotenburo (outdoor bath). The design can be all different, from sleek, modern lines to old style cedar and bamboo baths. Of course the mineral content of the water will differ in different locations

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They very a lot.

Some have clear water which are gensen, others are brown and contain a lot of iron and look and look and smell like rusty iron.

Then you get some that are brown but contain radium.

 

There are also white sulfur onsens that smell like rotten eggs, salt onsens as well as acidic onsens.

Temps of the water can vary from a very cool 35oC to as high as 50oC.

 

They can be anything from really small to really big and can be found anywhere from the edge of a river to a posh hotel to the middle of a village.

 

They also have different healing and relaxing properties.

Ones such as radium onsens are good to help people recover and cure certain health ailments, others that have clea water that have a slippery feel to the water are good for your skin.

 

There are also green, red, blue, white, black, purple and yellow coloured water onsens, although quite a few of these located in Kyushu are way way to hot to actually go in, and are more as a sightseeing attraction.

 

There are also grey mud onsens where tje water contains a grey looking mud which you smear over your body, it is supposed to make you look more younger and make your skin tighter if used a lot.

 

There was a nice one I went to in Kyushu not far from Bepu that was like this.

 

You also have a choice of segregated or mixed onsens in some places too.

 

Just a brief description from an onsen feak, lol.

 

I must have been to like 1000 plus onsen all over Japan in the time I have been here.

 

Happy onsen ing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The biggest difference I guess is that in the northern part of Japan, mixed onsens are not uncommon, but they are in the middle of Honshu. You've generally got to look for one and go out of your way if you want to go in with your missus (and other people).

 

I like outdoor ones and generally have to be wet or cold or something to want to pay to go in an indoor one. We have an onsen style bath at home, so I like people getting money from me to outdo that. Its like paying a restaurant for food you can make better yourself.

 

I'm not a massive fan of the free ones at Nozawa because most of them are too cramped. The one closest to the place we normally stay only has a tiny wooden lattice to get changed on and its right at the door with people coming in and out. No showers either, so its a case of squatting down by the bath and trying to scoop water out without disturbing someone in the bath or right next to it getting changed. An ordinary 400 yen onsen somewhere else with a changing room and showers is more relaxing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The biggest difference I guess is that in the northern part of Japan, mixed onsens are not uncommon, but they are in the middle of Honshu. You've generally got to look for one and go out of your way if you want to go in with your missus (and other people).

 

I like outdoor ones and generally have to be wet or cold or something to want to pay to go in an indoor one. We have an onsen style bath at home, so I like people getting money from me to outdo that. Its like paying a restaurant for food you can make better yourself.

 

I'm not a massive fan of the free ones at Nozawa because most of them are too cramped. The one closest to the place we normally stay only has a tiny wooden lattice to get changed on and its right at the door with people coming in and out. No showers either, so its a case of squatting down by the bath and trying to scoop water out without disturbing someone in the bath or right next to it getting changed. An ordinary 400 yen onsen somewhere else with a changing room and showers is more relaxing.

 

Yes. This!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoy beautiful onsen in a good hotel if I stay somewhere.

The kind with saunas and the like too.

gouka!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The biggest difference I guess is that in the northern part of Japan, mixed onsens are not uncommon, but they are in the middle of Honshu. You've generally got to look for one and go out of your way if you want to go in with your missus (and other people).

 

I like outdoor ones and generally have to be wet or cold or something to want to pay to go in an indoor one. We have an onsen style bath at home, so I like people getting money from me to outdo that. Its like paying a restaurant for food you can make better yourself.

 

I'm not a massive fan of the free ones at Nozawa because most of them are too cramped. The one closest to the place we normally stay only has a tiny wooden lattice to get changed on and its right at the door with people coming in and out. No showers either, so its a case of squatting down by the bath and trying to scoop water out without disturbing someone in the bath or right next to it getting changed. An ordinary 400 yen onsen somewhere else with a changing room and showers is more relaxing.

 

Mr. Wiggles, I found more mixed onsen down in Kyushu and up in Hokkaido than here on Honshu. I have seen kashikiri places around Hinshu proper but not many mixed onsen unfortunately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have 4 mixed onsen here in Yamanashi that I know of and two which I have been too, one was real nice all open but set in the trees by a river. Very nice in autumn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oops m(_ _)m My bad! Thanks!

 

Yes, Hinshu is a brand new Sento Lando/Amuzumento Paaku that is berry berry toppu secretto!!! Only Abe and his Nihon Kaigi underlings know the secret place!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They very a lot.

Some have clear water which are gensen, others are brown and contain a lot of iron and look and look and smell like rusty iron.

Then you get some that are brown but contain radium.

 

There are also white sulfur onsens that smell like rotten eggs, salt onsens as well as acidic onsens.

Temps of the water can vary from a very cool 35oC to as high as 50oC.

 

They can be anything from really small to really big and can be found anywhere from the edge of a river to a posh hotel to the middle of a village.

 

They also have different healing and relaxing properties.

Ones such as radium onsens are good to help people recover and cure certain health ailments, others that have clea water that have a slippery feel to the water are good for your skin.

 

There are also green, red, blue, white, black, purple and yellow coloured water onsens, although quite a few of these located in Kyushu are way way to hot to actually go in, and are more as a sightseeing attraction.

 

There are also grey mud onsens where tje water contains a grey looking mud which you smear over your body, it is supposed to make you look more younger and make your skin tighter if used a lot.

 

There was a nice one I went to in Kyushu not far from Bepu that was like this.

 

You also have a choice of segregated or mixed onsens in some places too.

 

Just a brief description from an onsen feak, lol.

 

I must have been to like 1000 plus onsen all over Japan in the time I have been here.

 

Happy onsen ing.

Great write up on onsens you should do an onsen guide I would donate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, I probably could write a guide I have enough info I have collected and experience going into them, but trying to sit down long enough and actually get my arse into gear to write a guide well that is another thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dont calculate how much time you spend on these forums then :friend: you would be amazed what you could achieve

I have been thinking about writing a small book on how too catch crayfish(lobster) for years now and haven't go around to it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks folks, interesting stuff.

 

I am looking forward to trying some out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

sjf2019l.png

About SnowJapan

SnowJapan.com is the independent guide to skiing and snowboarding in Japan and has been online since 1999.

SnowJapan.com covers the whole of Japan. We are here to introduce the world to unbiased, honest and detailed information about winter sports in Japan. We publish exclusive and in-depth and daily content throughout the winter season and we add new functionality and content to the site every year.

We are not here to promote any specific destinations or resorts, or to sell our readers any kind of products or services. We are not a travel agency and we do not own any ski resorts, ski schools, accommodations or other related businesses.

Latest Community Content

×