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So i'm getting to the point in my skiing where i feel buying my own boots could be a good idea.

 

Generally my feet will end up numb or just really sore after a day in rental boots as i think my feet are slightly different sizes, prolly half a size between the two.

 

A mate of mine bought boots when he was living in Canada from a place called Sure Foot that had a machine that mapped his feet with lasers and he tells me his boots have never fit so well.

 

So does anyone know of somewhere in Australia (i live in Brisbane but get to travel to Sydney and Melbourne with work every now and then) that offer a service like this?

 

have also seen a vacu-fit machine does anyone have experience with these?

 

or what are peolpes thoughts on ski boot fitting? any tips or advice would be greatly appreciated :)

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Because of an accident many years ago, where I broke every bone in my right foot it is somewhat out of shape, so I had my boots custom fitted in Tokyo when I bought the boots.

But they didn't use anything as sophisticated as a laser they just mark the inner lining where it touches on the foot then adjust the boots to fit using a machine.

I have been wearing the same boots for about 6 years now and always feel comfortable even after a days hard skiing!

 

Can't help you as you are in Australia, but it certainly is worth getting them made to fit your feet.

As I asked to have them adjusted when I bought them it was free, but don't know about other places.

I reckon even if you got to pay a bit it is well worth it.

 

I'm sure one of the other members here will be able to help you more than I can!

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Dunno either, but getting ur own boots are always better than renting. :thumbsup:

 

Not being funny but posting on an Oz snow forum might be better for you in terms of good shop recommendations

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You don't need lasers, just a good boot fitter. Just type in "Brisbane boot fitters" in a search engine. Other people will have asked the same question so I am sure you can find an answer.

 

My feet are different sizes too (about 5mm or half a size) but that shouldn't cause discomfort. The soreness and numbness is from poorly fitting rental boots that would still hurt even if your feet were the same size. Also, there are no half sizes in ski boots. The shell and the liner are the same for whole and half sizes. The only difference is the thickness of the insole inside the liner.

 

The most basic thing a boot fitter should do is a shell check. This is where the liner is taken out of the plastic shell and you place your foot inside the shell. The fitter should check for length by getting you to move your foot forwards so that your toes touch the end and see how much space is behind your heel (it should be roughly 15-30mm). Then they should check that the shell fits the rest of your foot shape by having you place your foot in the centre of the shell and looking at how it fits around the foot. The liner packs out after use so it is important that the hard plastic shell fits your foot length and shape as tightly as possible without causing discomfort.

 

If they don't do a shell check, go to a different shop.

 

The vacufit machine is for a line of Fischer boots that are made out of a heat moldable plastic. You also don't need these. How well they work depends on the expertise and experience of the boot fitter using the vacufit machine. You should just focus on getting a boot that fits your foot well from the get-go. If necessary, a boot fitter can punch out or grind problem areas to make more room. Good boot-fitters should offer a fit guarantee so that you can go back and make adjustments over one or two years. The important thing is to get a tight fitting boot as it is much easier to make room in a boot than it is to take up volume without losing performance.

 

How good of a skier are you and what kind of skiing do you do?

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thanks for the input guys :) I know Tubby but as yoroshiku said there are just a couple of us on here ;)

 

Besniwod, great advice thanks :) I know traditional methods for fitting are good I was just curious about the laser fitting option as well.

 

I'm an intermediate skier and I mostly ski on piste but as I get better i'd like to explore off piste a little, and unfortunately I only get to ski every 18 - 24 months at this point :( and mostly in NZ, but I did spend an amazing 10 days in Niseko last feb and got some powder action :)

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What a lot of people do when buying boots is try on a pair and then keep trying on bigger sizes until they feel comfortable and then buy those and end up with boots way too big for them. I heard that a huge percentage of skiers have boots a size or even two sizes too big for them. This would be the process as I understand it: Get your feet measured for the correct size both length and last and then try to find a pair of boots that feels comfortable in that size (hint: most of them will feel horribly uncomfortable or even painful!). When you eventually get the pair that feels comfortable (or least uncomfortable), thats probably the one to go for (assuming its in roughly the right stiffness for the type of skiing you wanna do) and then you can get it heat fitted and any other sore points sorted out by the bootfitter.

I bought some new boots this season and that's roughly the process I went through - first day out was a nightmare - couldn't keep them on my feet for more than one run at a time!! But then I didnt do the heat fitting. They've been a lot better since, but I might need them stretched a little around the toe area in one of the boots (my left foot is over a full size bigger than my right!)

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Or you can just become a boarder and buy boots that fit you from the start

 

Everytime I have to put my ski boots on I decide I'm going to take up boarding, but then each time I ski straight onto a lift, then ski straight off again I decide it's better to be a skier. :-)

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Had but two seasons (about 1.5 weeks) in hire boots before I bought my own. NO regrets!

 

Mine have thermofit, means that the fitter heats the lining, then I stick my feet in and wait for them to cool (or cook, as my original typo went :lol: )

 

The need was because of a huge (and growing) spur on my right big toe - yep, verging on TMI, I know! But the point is that the fitting has allowed me to ski virtually pain-free for over 13 years! That brings me to the realisation that I might be in line for a new pair at some fairly near future time.

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Snowdude, or anyone else that has had boots fitted/stretched in Tokyo,

 

Could you let me know the name of the place where you had the stretching done in Tokyo? The boots I just bought are a little short and narrow, despite breaking them in this season.

 

It would be ideal to have somebody who can speak English, but I'm willing to settle for somebody who is competent since I speak Japanese. I bought the boots from Fuso Sports, and was thinking of calling them to see if they could be of any help.

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after that many years, the mold (<- fungal kind) would be quite horrendous. Do not put any body part in there anymore.

Fungal treatment after each wearing (well, after each season, in fact!) ensures no growths in there - Smells as clean and fresh as the day they were bought. :p

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ICI sports in Kanda had a bootfitter who spoke great English (he had spent time in Aussie) last year. Don't know if he is there now.

ICI sports also in Nagano if you are anywhere near there on your travels.

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