Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Originally Posted By: Chriselle


"I think I'm turning Japanese, I think I'm turning Japanese I really think so"
Heard that old Vapours song on accuradio yesterday...lol


Like some of you I have permanent residence status. I've considered albeit only briefly about becoming a citizen, but nah....always seemed similar to buying a 747 just to get the free bag of peanuts.


You could get free beer as well though, in a plastic cup!
Surely that makes it worth it.
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 149
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I respect the Japanese position even if I don't agree with it. Every sovereign nation has the right to decide who comes to reside within their borders and what the terms of that arrangement are. It's

Wow, that really reminds me of the llama that attacked me on a farm in Kyushu. I asked him if he was naturalized and he tried to head-butt me, spat at me, and aimed a vicious kick at my chest. He missed every time, but it was a powerful lesson in the emotions that the question of citizenship can evoke.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Goosie
not rerad the entire thread. But sounds like a person who is not pleased with himself would contemplate this.


Yeah the millions of people who've migrated to other countries to live and then became citizens of those countries must all be very unpleased with themselves!
The Brits must be very unpleased with themselves since so many of the buggers have moved to and become citizens here in Australia!! lol
Link to post
Share on other sites

... and spend so much energy bitching and complaining about everything here that you'd think they'd be better off going back home! "Whinging Pom" was invented for them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Tex
[

Are you saying there is no difference to just living somewhere as a resident/visitor and being a citizen? Or that being a citizen (from birth or otherwise) does not entail any commitment?


I'd say no to this. I lived in Jp for 11 years and had a Permanent Resident visa. Wether I was PR or a Citizen of JP I think would make F$&k all difference to my daily life and to how I was treated by Japanese people or Govt so why the heck would you?

On the other side of the coin, My wife now living in Australia (with me!) as a Permanent Resident has all the rights of an Aussie except voting but if she decides she wants to become a citizen she also has to give up her Japanese citizenship. The only thing this would do would enable her to vote and for her to become a Gaijin in her own country. I really don't see the point. Even when other married in family members from the UK do their naturalisation I really dont see the point when they say , "yay, I'm an Aussie now" They really only do it because they don't have to give up their original nationality..
Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Indo
Originally Posted By: Tex
[

Are you saying there is no difference to just living somewhere as a resident/visitor and being a citizen? Or that being a citizen (from birth or otherwise) does not entail any commitment?


I'd say no to this. I lived in Jp for 11 years and had a Permanent Resident visa. Wether I was PR or a Citizen of JP I think would make F$&k all difference to my daily life and to how I was treated by Japanese people or Govt so why the heck would you?

On the other side of the coin, My wife now living in Australia (with me!) as a Permanent Resident has all the rights of an Aussie except voting but if she decides she wants to become a citizen she also has to give up her Japanese citizenship. The only thing this would do would enable her to vote and for her to become a Gaijin in her own country. I really don't see the point. Even when other married in family members from the UK do their naturalisation I really dont see the point when they say , "yay, I'm an Aussie now" They really only do it because they don't have to give up their original nationality..


not actually, the aussie government allows dual citizenship, right? So it would only be the Japanese govt that, if they knew, would ask that she chose.....she doesn't need to tell them. She can take citizenship and keep her Japanese passport and neither the twain shall meet
Link to post
Share on other sites

No, it doesn´t work out that way.

The Aussie government (acts like an agent) and takes your Japanese passport and gives it to the Japas. I complained about that, but that´s how it´s done.

The only thing that the Japanese can´t do without your consent is get you off the Koseki-Tohon (registar). They used to hassle me when I had the need to go to the embassy in Oz.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: TubbyBeaverinho
Originally Posted By: Indo
Originally Posted By: Tex
[

Are you saying there is no difference to just living somewhere as a resident/visitor and being a citizen? Or that being a citizen (from birth or otherwise) does not entail any commitment?


I'd say no to this. I lived in Jp for 11 years and had a Permanent Resident visa. Wether I was PR or a Citizen of JP I think would make F$&k all difference to my daily life and to how I was treated by Japanese people or Govt so why the heck would you?

On the other side of the coin, My wife now living in Australia (with me!) as a Permanent Resident has all the rights of an Aussie except voting but if she decides she wants to become a citizen she also has to give up her Japanese citizenship. The only thing this would do would enable her to vote and for her to become a Gaijin in her own country. I really don't see the point. Even when other married in family members from the UK do their naturalisation I really dont see the point when they say , "yay, I'm an Aussie now" They really only do it because they don't have to give up their original nationality..


not actually, the aussie government allows dual citizenship, right? So it would only be the Japanese govt that, if they knew, would ask that she chose.....she doesn't need to tell them. She can take citizenship and keep her Japanese passport and neither the twain shall meet



From the AUS website:

Dual citizenship

Main content
It is possible to hold citizenship of two or more countries if the law of those countries allow. This is known as dual, or multiple, citizenship.
People can become dual citizens automatically, or after being granted citizenship of another country.
For example, an Australian citizen may automatically gain citizenship of another country through marriage, while a permanent resident of Australia may become a dual citizen by becoming an Australian citizen.
Prior to 4 April 2002, Australian citizens who became citizens of another country lost their Australian citizenship automatically.
Can you become a dual citizen?

Australia allows its citizens to hold dual nationality. Other countries may not. To check if your country allows its citizens to hold dual or multiple citizenships, contact the embassy or consulate of that country in Australia.

So if Japan says no, then Australia would be forced to say no too.
Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Jynxx
No, it doesn´t work out that way.
The Aussie government (acts like an agent) and takes your Japanese passport and gives it to the Japas. I complained about that, but that´s how it´s done.
The only thing that the Japanese can´t do without your consent is get you off the Koseki-Tohon (registar). They used to hassle me when I had the need to go to the embassy in Oz.


So are you Australian then, or Japanese?

(Sounds like this became an issue for you before Australia permitted dual citizenship.)
Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Man_In_Japan
Originally Posted By: TubbyBeaverinho
Originally Posted By: Indo
[

Are you saying there is no difference to just living somewhere as a resident/visitor and being a citizen? Or that being a citizen (from birth or otherwise) does not entail any commitment?


I'd say no to this. I lived in Jp for 11 years and had a Permanent Resident visa. Wether I was PR or a Citizen of JP I think would make F$&k all difference to my daily life and to how I was treated by Japanese people or Govt so why the heck would you?

On the other side of the coin, My wife now living in Australia (with me!) as a Permanent Resident has all the rights of an Aussie except voting but if she decides she wants to become a citizen she also has to give up her Japanese citizenship. The only thing this would do would enable her to vote and for her to become a Gaijin in her own country. I really don't see the point. Even when other married in family members from the UK do their naturalisation I really dont see the point when they say , "yay, I'm an Aussie now" They really only do it because they don't have to give up their original nationality..


not actually, the aussie government allows dual citizenship, right? So it would only be the Japanese govt that, if they knew, would ask that she chose.....she doesn't need to tell them. She can take citizenship and keep her Japanese passport and neither the twain shall meet



From the AUS website:

Dual citizenship

Main content
It is possible to hold citizenship of two or more countries if the law of those countries allow. This is known as dual, or multiple, citizenship.
People can become dual citizens automatically, or after being granted citizenship of another country.
For example, an Australian citizen may automatically gain citizenship of another country through marriage, while a permanent resident of Australia may become a dual citizen by becoming an Australian citizen.
Prior to 4 April 2002, Australian citizens who became citizens of another country lost their Australian citizenship automatically.
Can you become a dual citizen?

Australia allows its citizens to hold dual nationality. Other countries may not. To check if your country allows its citizens to hold dual or multiple citizenships, contact the embassy or consulate of that country in Australia.

So if Japan says no, then Australia would be forced to say no too.


But Australia, or any other country for that matter can't confiscate your passport......it doesn't even belong to you, it belong's to your government. So they could only inform you that you MUST inform the Japanese Government, in conjunction with the Japanese Govt's policy of non-dual citizens, that you have become an Australian Citizen and you would like to give up your Japanese citizenship. Of course you say..."of course sir, I'll shall run right over to the embassy now and hand in this passport" and then amble into the nearest pub and order yourself a couple of pints.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, Tubs, I wished it was like that.

Like I said, I protested and told the Aussie who was dealing with that issue (of taking away my passport) that it was my business to deal with the Japas and it doesn´t sound like maintaining national sovereignty when Australia is acting like an agent for the Japanese government by collecting my passport.

The Japanese could have cancelled my passport and/or take it away if I´d tried to use it at a later date.

 

I really am not sure about the dual citizenship rule to be honest.

My understanding is that if you come into Oz, regardless of where you are coming from (that policy of your original nationality) the Aussies will allow dual citizenship. However, if an Aussie takes up a new citizenship, you lose your Australian citizenship. Not fair, huh!?

What is not okay with me is:

At the moment I don´t even have a Japanese permanent visa.

That sucks.

Since I am an Aussie (by naturalization) and if I want to revert and get back my Japanese citizenship, it is not too difficult.

But about getting a Japanese permanent residency, I actually need a Hosho-nin (a person who will vouch and take up financial responsibilities when one stuffs up - my advice, never become a Hosho-nin!)

If I get a Japanese citizenship, I lose my Aussie one but I am entitled to be a permanent resident. I really don´t know about the super-annuation and stuff...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Metabo, and everyone ...

As far as I am concerned, it´s none of anyone´s god damn business about reasons for one to take up a citizenship.

nor any shit baggage shoved on ya shoulders for doing so.

Whinging Poms can go back home.

The Royals and Commonwealth stink to high heaven, I swore alliance to the Queen, but no way took an oath to the Queen.

You know, when one becomes an Aussie, at the ceremony the ones whom took an oath are separated from the others and form a line in the front separated by a red ribbon. Ha!

 

I was born in Thailand, parents Japanese, grew up in England, back to Japan, and "bin an Aussie" for 25 years. Don´t know what I am. Don´t really understand anything anymore. I have insights, that´s all.

I speak ´stralian and rusty Kansai-ben and Yamanote-Tokyo Japanese.

But I really thought since I was a kid, that in the future there will be no passports ... and politicians.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: TubbyBeaverinho
Originally Posted By: Man_In_Japan
Originally Posted By: TubbyBeaverinho
[

Are you saying there is no difference to just living somewhere as a resident/visitor and being a citizen? Or that being a citizen (from birth or otherwise) does not entail any commitment?


I'd say no to this. I lived in Jp for 11 years and had a Permanent Resident visa. Wether I was PR or a Citizen of JP I think would make F$&k all difference to my daily life and to how I was treated by Japanese people or Govt so why the heck would you?

On the other side of the coin, My wife now living in Australia (with me!) as a Permanent Resident has all the rights of an Aussie except voting but if she decides she wants to become a citizen she also has to give up her Japanese citizenship. The only thing this would do would enable her to vote and for her to become a Gaijin in her own country. I really don't see the point. Even when other married in family members from the UK do their naturalisation I really dont see the point when they say , "yay, I'm an Aussie now" They really only do it because they don't have to give up their original nationality..


not actually, the aussie government allows dual citizenship, right? So it would only be the Japanese govt that, if they knew, would ask that she chose.....she doesn't need to tell them. She can take citizenship and keep her Japanese passport and neither the twain shall meet



From the AUS website:

Dual citizenship

Main content
It is possible to hold citizenship of two or more countries if the law of those countries allow. This is known as dual, or multiple, citizenship.
People can become dual citizens automatically, or after being granted citizenship of another country.
For example, an Australian citizen may automatically gain citizenship of another country through marriage, while a permanent resident of Australia may become a dual citizen by becoming an Australian citizen.
Prior to 4 April 2002, Australian citizens who became citizens of another country lost their Australian citizenship automatically.
Can you become a dual citizen?

Australia allows its citizens to hold dual nationality. Other countries may not. To check if your country allows its citizens to hold dual or multiple citizenships, contact the embassy or consulate of that country in Australia.

So if Japan says no, then Australia would be forced to say no too.


But Australia, or any other country for that matter can't confiscate your passport......it doesn't even belong to you, it belong's to your government. So they could only inform you that you MUST inform the Japanese Government, in conjunction with the Japanese Govt's policy of non-dual citizens, that you have become an Australian Citizen and you would like to give up your Japanese citizenship. Of course you say..."of course sir, I'll shall run right over to the embassy now and hand in this passport" and then amble into the nearest pub and order yourself a couple of pints.


From what I have heard from a friend, that is pretty much nail on the head. However, he also said that when he entered/left he should use an Australian passport, and the same for Japan, but with a Japanese passport.

Wonder what would happen to him if he were to be searched? omg
Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah of course you'd need to do the switcherooney with the passports when going through immigration. I've a few mates who do this with their kids passports.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Announcements


×
×
  • Create New...