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Hey I need to get a new desktop PC soon and thinking of waiting to get one with Windows 7 on. I'd rather get it with that on straight off rather than get one of these upgrade program things. Not clear to me though when I'll be able to get one of them, say from Dell. Anyone able to enlighten me?

 

Thanks.

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I'd definitely wait though..... if you do one of the upgrade things you might end up waiting quite a while to actually get the upgrade. I know with Vista took my friend 2 months after it's release to be sent the free upgrade. Best starting out with a "clean" machine on 7 anyway.

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Ah, the old "it'll be buggy for 6 months" MS story.

File under old wives tales that simply don't budge.

 

RC version has been out for a while now, even the beta before that was stable. There will be nothing wrong with W7 on release and you will get any tweaks by update. Nothing to worry about.

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How so? It's pretty much been like that since '95.

 

When first got xp, kept crashing my pc, vista had so many issues with my hardware, drivers not working with it, even though they worked with xp, issues with licenses, slower transfer rates than with xp, even though am using the same usb2.0 ports. Want me to to go on? These problems, have only really been fully solved with the service packs they keep sending ot.

 

Oh yeah, major headaches with the automatic updating system, especially if I choose to download one part of the pack and not all of it.

 

But that's personal experience, back up by tens of thousands of other users.

 

Yet, with this new incarnation, and much more expansive beta testing, it should work a lot better out of the box, the xp or vista.

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I got Vista when it was first out.

 

No problems at all. I really liked it from the word go. Probably I'm one of the 'tens of thousands' - perhaps even more wink - of users who thought that. We're perhaps not as vociforous as the anti-MS protestors.

 

I'll be getting Windows 7 as well on a new machine in October/November with no hesitation.

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Just to add my comments. I have never had any real problems with Vista. I think some people just make it up. Or just should loudly whenever anything happens. People who just get on with it and enjoy using it just get on with doing that.

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From what I have read as well - as MS got a fair amount of loudmouthed stick for Vista at the beginning, they have made sure that this time round things are better prepared. I'm far from being an expert on this but I would expect things to be quite different this time.

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GG - they haven't had much of a choice now, what with Google rumoured to be interested in o/s, and also cloud computing gaining momentum. This could be the real last big o/s to come out in this kind of form.

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Originally Posted By: RobBright
But even then, windows 7 is gonna come shipped with bugs - would really stick with xp/vista for the first 6 mths of windows 7 life cycle.


Originally Posted By: RobBright
It's pretty much been like that since '95.


....

Originally Posted By: RobBright
they haven't had much of a choice now


So which is it then? A mess on release, or not?

wink
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Back on Windows 7 - I downloaded the RC version on to my PC at home. I think it is really good. Not a single problem with the download or operation and all drivers etc come good. Some good new stuff in there. I wouldn't have a problem getting a new machine with it on from the beginning.

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Windows 7 to be released on October 22.

 

Quote:

Windows 7 is the successor to Vista, the highly unpopular operating system that was panned by critics and users alike. Vista was bloated and processor-intensive, and Microsoft hopes that the leaner footprint of Windows 7 will do much to win over consumers. Windows 7 builds on many of Vista's best bits, but has been tweaked and refined to make the user experience a more enjoyable and less frustrating one.

 

Minimum system requirements: 1GHz 32-bit processor; 1GB RAM; 16GB available hard disk space; DirectX9 graphics device. Windows Vista users will be able to preserve many of their files and settings when upgrading to Windows 7; those still running Windows XP will need to perform a clean install.

 

Desktop: The Windows 7 desktop is similar in look and feel to Windows Vista, but boasts some handy new tools to help users work more efficiently. Aero Peek turns all of the open windows and folders on your desktop translucent, allowing you to see what you’re working on, and switch quickly to the document or program you need. The addition of Jump Lists makes it really easy to access the songs, pictures or favourite websites you visit every day. You can “pin†items, such as videos or music, to the Jump List, rather like a virtual corkboard, and even use the Jump List to access common shortcuts, such as writing a new email message or creating a blank Word document.

 

Home networking: Windows 7 has been designed with multiple users in mind – Microsoft understands that a single household may have multiple computer users, who may want to be able to quickly and easily share documents between machines without having to transfer them via USB sticks or go through complex procedures to copy the files to a communal space. The new HomeGroup function gives one-click sharing of files and folders between PCs on the same network. It’s all password-protected too, so you have control over what areas of your computer other people can and cannot access.

 

Performance: This is one area where Windows 7 knocks the spots off its predecessor, Vista. The whole operating system has been turbocharged to help users do what they want more quickly. That means your computer will boot up faster and connect to a Wi-Fi network more quickly; searching for files and documents is easier, and results will be delivered more quickly, and grouped in to helpful categories to make it simple to find what you need; Windows 7 is also less processor-hungry than Vista, because it has been tweaked to only run the programs and services you need, when you need them. If you’re a laptop user, you’ll also appreciate Windows 7’s new power-management tools, which could help you to conserve your computer’s battery life. There’s support, too, for touch-screen interfaces.

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