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Sounds like a typical government job, no matter where in the world!

 

I do not envy you the cr@p, but there MUST be some compensations, else nobody would be interested. As I mentioned, I'd be interested in a placement as liaison, currently limited nihongo but years of experience as a teacher and an understanding of how people operate.

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Originally Posted By: thursday
Already have Neanderthal guests, just ask some to stand at the door for a free pint.


hahaha Nice and true. Just goes to show doesn't it, change isn't always for the good/better.
That is one of the true great things about Japan- no security, dress code etc. when you go out. All of my family & friends are amazed at that when they come for a visit. "Will I get in without a collar?" "Are these shoes (read thongs) okay?"
Just a matter of time... and when that happens (bouncers) that will only bring MORE troble, fights, fisticuffs etc. Sad days indeed. sadface
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And thats what we are trying to avoid- though after a meeting today with my bosses and some of the J-powers that be around here, I dont have much hope to any forward progress on how things will operate here in the near future. The tourism board here has been slashed to the bone as of this spring, and those that remain are solidly in the " 3-5 years to retirement-If I can`t photocopy it on the way to the smoke break room- it ain`t happening" school of thought.

 

As for the Neanderthal bouncers thing, you obviously haven`t seen my mug in person- sadly I am about as Cro-Magnon as they come- a small Japanese family is considering subleting the space created by my forehead overhang.

 

sadface

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Ok lets rephrase this cause no matter what I write people will dis-agree. You go to any bar in Japan that routinely gets 50 to 200 people on a big night and they have security staff. Japan is not oblivious to the problems of alcohol. To think otherwise is to be living in a dream world.

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Originally Posted By: D train
uhh...

before you get dream job thoughts running through your head- I work for the JAPANESE government - which means...

6 days a week
9 hours a day
shifts that usually end around 2 am
meetings and appointments during non working hours which I am required to attend.
80 and even 100 hour weeks during the busy Xmas and CNY seasons.
Daily dealing with Japanese pension and business owners who view me as the sounding board to all their grievances with the gaijin
Foriegners who see me as the face of "the man" and call me at all hours with whatever issues at hand.
perhaps the smokiest work enviroment on the planet outside of a chimney sweep
having to write daily logs and reports for every .single. person. that walks through the door.In Japanese. Then log this info into a computer data base that will probably never be read.ever.

all for the princely sum of 200,000 yen a month - or roughly 4/5ths of what a fresh off the boat english teacher makes for 3-5 class hours a day.

This is a labour of love- I think if youy did a ask round of most of the Niseko locals on this forum you would find most of them think my job is kinda cool and kinda interesting- and all of them would give a polite " thanks but bugger that" if you asked them to do it.



thanks for sharing that. I can relate to what your work is like being somewhat in the same boat (but as a full-time teacher). I love my students here at my school, my homeroom kids, and all my classes are a joy to be in/teach. The kids are the main reason why I work like a dawg - and my mates such as Fattwins and Bushpig just shake their head at what I do. But, I get paid quite well. If you cut my salary down to 20man/month, or change my students to the last school I was at with my current work load, and I would quit.

It seems like you really enjoy what you do D-train, but if its THAT much work, why would you only do it for 20man/month?

I think it'd be pretty cool if SJ did an interview with you - thats one Id like to read smile
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Originally Posted By: Fattwins
Ok lets rephrase this cause no matter what I write people will dis-agree. You go to any bar in Japan that routinely gets 50 to 200 people on a big night and they have security staff. Japan is not oblivious to the problems of alcohol. To think otherwise is to be living in a dream world.


I haven't been to Hokkers for a couple of years now but last time I went there weren't any places that would have accommodated those numbers (well easily and routinely anyway). You're right though, there are some places that have security.

No one is suggesting that Japan is oblivious to the problems of alcohol but the places that I frequent have no visible sign of security. That surely says something about Japan and the culture of going out to bars/cafes/nightclubs and the direct correlation with fisticuffs?
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Oh right, so it's not actually "visit any other bar in Japan and you will see bouncers" or "any bar in Japan that routinely gets 50 to 200 people on a big night and they have security staff" then?

 

Got it.

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Only ever saw bouncers in bars in the big cities. Not really hung out at bars around the slopes as I usually do day trips, the one in Naeba didn't appear to have bouncers and the one in Myoko was the same, but there were a lot of locals hanging round so maybe they double up as punters and bouncers when the need arises to help their mates. Obviously up in Tokyo there are many places that employ doorstaff

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No need, If it really gets out of trouble the professionals (Yakuza) comes in.

Roppongi and Shinjuku have Yakuza office. I had been an interpreter and teacher in Japan and trained staff security situations at Shinjuku discos. Most of the problem was military and ex-military.

 

The problem can be solved when lift tickets can be bought with ID (passport) only. You cause a problem, no more lift tickets. If that doesn't stop, deportation on one's own account. Simple.

 

 

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Originally Posted By: Creek Boy
city bars vs inaka bars are quite different. you cant compare where you live with the likes of Roppongi


What if I live in Roppongi?????? wink
Maybe I've missed something here, but I thought this post was about Niseko, which is pretty much 'inaka' in most peeps books.

I'm with the Mster, I got it!

I'll say it again bcos it seems to be getting a little off track but the day (and its not too far away) bouncers start to have a presence in bars in snow towns, is the day we know that things have changed for the worse. I might go to facebook and start a group- "Say NO to bouncers in Snow Towns." lol
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I guess it's a matter of perspective.

 

A "bouncer's" role could be perceived to be throwing out trouble makers.

 

Or his/her roles could be to:

 

offer a genuine welcome to guests on their arrival

 

check that the patrons enjoying the bar / restaurant / club are of age

 

check that the patrons are not intoxicated prior to their admittance

 

refuse addmittance to known trouble makers

 

help bar staff in clearing empty glasses to make the customer's experience better

 

diffuse any unfortunate situations before they get out of hand

 

help patrons with the booking of taxis

 

help patrons with directions to other establishments and / or their accommodation

 

recognise when someone needs help getting home

 

wish patrons a genuine goodbye

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And all of that while trying not to look like a refugee from the ape house at the zoo, keeping knuckles off the ground and suchlike.

 

Interesting perspective on the role of "bouncer". Probably better described as door security (and a far nicer sounding name too!)

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So by proactively putting or adding security to growing communities not dying ones we are killing culture? This makes no sense. There are growing communities that need to address these issues of keeping people safe. Walk into the local inaka police office speaking zero Japanese and see what happens. proactive thinking solves problems before they happen or at least mitigates the situation. Bars that are experiencing growth have to grow as well.

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agree, FT. (OMG I can't believe I wrote that! wink)

 

There is a need for the more popular bars etc to make some provision for the likelihood of rowdy patrons, else the rest will stay away.

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