Jump to content
SnowJapan Community
  • Sign Up
Sign in to follow this  
ssar

Fisticuffs @ Niseko Sat 21 Feb

Recommended Posts

Look mate when I was a kid I thought there will be no passports and united currency in the future. People talk about "Free Trade" but we as a labour commodity cannot free trade our service anywhere in the world.

I can point out that there is a resurgence in right wing Japa patriotism. (Not only Japan, everywhere, especially USA, neo Nazi movement in Germany .. all around since the 9/11 time) Why don't people be sensible enough to keep a good name of being a Gaijin. A handful of people can make a bad name for others. Sure Japanese are xenophobic but being a Gaijin brings merit- you get treated better.. So, I am pointing out that these shitheads are making the situation worse. It is an outdated not so popular stand that we have only a little right and some privileges, some people have more.

Let me remind you a visa to USA is issued by the Dept. of internal affairs, and your permission to entry is granted by the Dept. of immigration. Having a visa does not give me the right to stay in that country. And I have been turned away 20 odd years ago.

Hey you stay there for 20 years, possibly get naturalized, you've done some work for the community and THEN tell me what it's like to have white skin in Japan. I can tell you what its like to be Asian in an anglo community.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I'm sure my feelings are little different to all the waves of immigrants to Aus over the years who endured racism. Not that racism in Japan is as in your face as it is in Aus, oh no the Japanese are way too polite to be racist to your face but as I'm sure you are aware there's plenty of undercurrents and media/government bias. And of course here they virtually have no immigration policy whatsoever.

I probably do get more worked up about it than most because my wife and I actually do intend on living here for the rest of our lives. We've bought a house here, are having our first child here and definitely consider Japan, not Australia, our home. But because we are both Australians the process of getting permanent residency or naturalized is a painfully long one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is really good on you. I am sure your kid will grow up with best of both worlds. When he speaks the language with no foreign accent, the receptions is way better. And he is born there. I hope he gets his Japanese citizenship.

It is strange but true. One QLD'er who owns a dropzone told me he reacts when he hears a foreign accent. He told me talking to me was like talking to a blue Aussie because I speak his language. When I taught English to Japanese people, I tried to give them a bit of confidence by saying Everyone has an accent.. Hispanic, Afro, Jamaican, Indian, Scot, Italian. Irish, Manchester (which the only thing I can hear is lol ) Aussie, NZ..you name it. So what's wrong with Japanese accent? I had to revise my thinking after that. Sorry, back to the topic...

Japanese has it's own difficulties but if you try, you will get respect for it. It says you want to learn the culture. Language itself is like a "culture that makes yogurt" you know what I mean. I am sure it will take time but it is worth it hey. Japan is a island country. Insular. like UK. I lived in Wimbledon for 5 years but it took a while to get accepted. Only when my parents said we have to go back to Japan, some o the English kids parents offered to look after me because I didn't want to go back. That was cool.

When I went back to Japan, people admired me in a pop-star sorta way, but despised for being westernized. I was an outsider. Got heaps for not being able to read. I had a writing ability of a 7 year old when I was 11 and took me 5 years to catch up. You can have the same skin colour and get it too..

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh my gosh Annupuri is like a friggin highway even a useless skier like myself can dodge a stationery person.

 

I did have a BIG crash on Hirafu Slope. Got hit full speed by a tiny Japanese Snowboarder (female) she was very sorry and embarrased. I have injuried my shoulder and hand but was more concerned that she was okay as she was so tiny and we really hit. Would have been a great view for people on the chairlift.

 

Mr Snowhunter was very impressed (hopefully after a little concern) as he said we collided and then both hit the deck and spun doing about 4 starfish turns on the snow.!!!!!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not busy at all, but if you are a cranky, hung-over skier then you have to keep your head up...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it's like a highway cos it's got slow lanes, fast lanes, hard shoulders, parking places for boarders (anywhere they like) and motorway service food.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

also, has a coffee shop for cranky skiiers to recover from their hangovers...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

interesting stats they keep up at Kutchan town

 

<< Resident Population >> (front month ratio)

7,668 men (- 1) 7,819 women (+2)

Total 15,487 people (+1)

Household 7,351 household (+1)

 

<<foreign register person >>

354 men (+2) 159 women (- 7)

Total 513 people (- 5)

 

Household 491 household (- 3)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: MikePow
**** get over it. Happens in every town in the world every drinking night.

And fyi, the local Aussie was a Kiwi.


No, it doesn't happen in every town in the world. Only amongst the ignorant who think drinking to excess is a good reason to harass others and cause physical pain.

Of course if this is part of growing up and the culture in your town, then that is fine. But the Japanese are never eager to see a bunch of foreigners come and get in fights, even if it is amongst themselves.

If it becomes a common occurrence, look for a heavier police presence, less inviting local population, and even immigration restrictions. The Japanese can be as paranoid as any culture when it comes to threats to their way of life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was at that pub on my trip back in Dec... Good food and good staff.

 

<rant>

It makes me angry when some toss pot (dosen't matter where they come from) gets very angry and violent. The night life in melbourne and sydney is getting the point that you rather stay at home

 

The thing is they don't care. hell I don't think they even remember it.

</rant>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Big fight in Shinjuku last night. About 10 gaijin brawling outside a bar there. Still hardly ever see it though (well, I hardly ever see it) which is different from back home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: SnowKobe
Originally Posted By: MikePow
**** get over it. Happens in every town in the world every drinking night.

And fyi, the local Aussie was a Kiwi.


No, it doesn't happen in every town in the world. Only amongst the ignorant who think drinking to excess is a good reason to harass others and cause physical pain.

Of course if this is part of growing up and the culture in your town, then that is fine. But the Japanese are never eager to see a bunch of foreigners come and get in fights, even if it is amongst themselves.


Neither is this non-Japanese person "eager to see a bunch of foreigners come and get in fights, even if it is amongst themselves".

Just stating facts as I've experienced them in big and small towns across the world during my travels.

Quote:
If it becomes a common occurrence, look for a heavier police presence, less inviting local population, and even immigration restrictions. The Japanese can be as paranoid as any culture when it comes to threats to their way of life.


Last two are a knee jerk reaction IMHO, but would welcome 'bobbies on the beat' and not just to curb unacceptable behaviour. A visible and approachable police force works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally Posted By: Blade
also, has a coffee shop for cranky skiiers to recover from their hangovers...


Is it possible to be hungover if you're pissed?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was alerted to this thread by someone and resurected my old Snowjapan membership to jump in with my two cents.

 

I work in Hirafu in the Safety centre next to the Seicomart and basically I am the police liasion officer for this season ( and presumably the next few). I think having us around this year made a general detterent to many of the problems that occured in seasons past and I think as everyone gets used to the idea we can do an even better job. From next season , all of the police assigned to this box will have English abilities ( they scoured all of Hokkaido and have come up with 5) and will try to work more closely with business owners and visitors alike to help reduce the three main problems we have - jacket/electronics/ski thefts, fights , and obnoxious drunks. From next seasson several of the bigger bars will have FREE coat checks and the police box will have the back room modified into a holding cell.

 

i think it is important to keep a good balance in this town between the ability to have a grand old time and minimizing the effects of these nights out. Having a jacket stolen or a wanker start a fight is not the way a Niseko holiday should be remembered and hopefully by next season further systems should be in place to help deal with these problems.

 

I was off the night in question and in Sapporo. All the bars have my cell number and indeed Paddys tried calling me. Most of the time this year these problems have been avoided before they ever got to this stage- and the number of incidents was considerably down this year - tho some say thats because I`m in here, not out on the piss. ; )

 

If anyone has suggestions as how we can do a better jobs , fire away. Now is the time to get the wheels in motion- before next season.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could offer me a job, for starters. I'd welcome the chance to work the season in Niseko (and probably have a few side trips to places thereabouts for a slide or six!)

 

No Police experience, but 10 years part-time Army (Reserves) and 30+ years as a teacher. Just sukoshi nihongo, but getting better - and a few days living there would do the world of good for my language skills.

 

Oh, and +1 would be willing to accompany me for the right inducements. wink

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

uhh...

 

before you get dream job thoughts running through your head- I work for the JAPANESE government - which means...

 

6 days a week

9 hours a day

shifts that usually end around 2 am

meetings and appointments during non working hours which I am required to attend.

80 and even 100 hour weeks during the busy Xmas and CNY seasons.

Daily dealing with Japanese pension and business owners who view me as the sounding board to all their grievances with the gaijin

Foriegners who see me as the face of "the man" and call me at all hours with whatever issues at hand.

perhaps the smokiest work enviroment on the planet outside of a chimney sweep

having to write daily logs and reports for every .single. person. that walks through the door.In Japanese. Then log this info into a computer data base that will probably never be read.ever.

 

all for the princely sum of 200,000 yen a month - or roughly 4/5ths of what a fresh off the boat english teacher makes for 3-5 class hours a day.

 

This is a labour of love- I think if youy did a ask round of most of the Niseko locals on this forum you would find most of them think my job is kinda cool and kinda interesting- and all of them would give a polite " thanks but bugger that" if you asked them to do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i just want one of your hats, could auction it off and cash in at the end of your contract, those things are in demand...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is just saddening that it has come to having Niseko with a holding cell and extra police. I remember one of the things I loved was telling everyone that there were no police in Niseko as it was so safe.

 

It is so sad that these Aussie individuals act like 18 yr olds that have never been away from home and never had alcohol. I get a big enough high when in Niseko from the snow and the skiing. Maybe they need to ski a little harder during the day because I can tell you every night our group, that ranged from 24yrs up to 40 yr olds, got home we would all have a couple of beers and crash as we had been going hard all day and we wanted to be on the first lift in the morning.

 

If you just want to get drunk and act like COMPLETE YOBBO's - STAY HOME - Go to NZ or Bali. Don't ruin it for the rest of us. angry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With increased tourism (people) comes more problems. Ive got to say that by having the forward thinking to hire limited police with English skills has to be applauded.

 

Every resort as it gets big will have problems. Every resort with a bar that gets crowded with either Japanese or whoever will have problems. It is called getting drunk.

 

I dont think that it is a step back but a step forward in protecting the guests at the resort. Go to whistler and count the number of people getting kicked out of bars. They are well equiped to lock up the bad asses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Fattwins on this.

 

Prevention is better than cure - providing visible policing now means lesss people drop thier standards because they think they 'can'...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

sjf2019l.png

About SnowJapan

SnowJapan.com is the independent guide to skiing and snowboarding in Japan and has been online since 1999.

SnowJapan.com covers the whole of Japan. We are here to introduce the world to unbiased, honest and detailed information about winter sports in Japan. We publish exclusive and in-depth and daily content throughout the winter season and we add new functionality and content to the site every year.

We are not here to promote any specific destinations or resorts, or to sell our readers any kind of products or services. We are not a travel agency and we do not own any ski resorts, ski schools, accommodations or other related businesses.

×