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rach

Cho-yummy things

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Not fair when neighbours do that is it. I hope they brought some round for you.

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I just had a big bowl of goya chanpuru made with goya fresh off the vine in my garden.

 

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Delicious.

 

My only regret is that it's lunchtime and I couldn't enjoy it with a couple of glasses of my favourite mild Awamori.

 

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It's celery season now! Do people usually eat celery leaves? I made very easy pasta sauce tonight and it was very good. Bacon, celery leaves, spinach, tomato, salt and black pepper. yummy~. \:\)

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Celery doesn't come in my "yummy" list. Far from it. I don't mind it though, 'they say' you lose weight eating it ;\)

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Yes slow, I eat it all. The leaves are the best bit actually. Your idea sounds good, I'll give it a go.

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Manju cake \:\) An oldie but a goodie... In fact, just about any steamed bun with whatever filling!

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Have you tried Angel Pies as well? There was a poll about Choco Pies and Angel Pies some time back.

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My gf makes a killer sweet potato pie. Can't get enough of that. And anko doughnuts as well. Not the best for a diet..

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Yes! Recently I've been into sweet mochi things. I like the strawberry daifuku or whatever they are called (pink mochi, cream, anko + strawberry).

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Whoah...that's inviting, Soubriquet!

But I know I have to behave, if I take what I want, probably I will get a lot more weight which is very hard to lose later on.

\:\(

 

I've been reading some cooking books to find some yummy but fewer calorie foods. A bit hard to find some though.

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It was a couple of weeks ago. I replaced the flimsy hoods on the bakery extractor fans with something more snow-proof. That smelled good. So does soubriquette.

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They look very yummy.

 

What is totoro no cake?

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Yes, they look good but do they have any flavour? Mock cream ain't cream, and glazed fruit is sometimes like eating a chilled cucumber.

 

I'm wary of eye-candy cake displays unless they have a 'continental' background e.g. the Viets have a French influence and make seriously good cakes and croissants.

 

How do yo'all find the Japanese 'continental' stuff? I tend to eat 'traditional' foods when I'm OS.

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Fair question SubZero. There are two styles of cake in Japan, traditional and western style (essentially French). Soubriquette specialises in western style, but has some traditional lines too.

 

She uses three different types of flour for the bases, depending on the application. She also uses three different types of cream. The fat content varies and is critical for flavour and texture.

 

Strawberries are organically grown and come from the south. The dried apricots come from Turkey, and the chocolate from Belgium, etc. etc. The "food mileage" aspect is pretty ugly, but she won't compromise the quality of the ingredients.

 

She's professional with a good palate, and it's her business. She's built it her way, from virtually nothing, in a very competitive market. Nothing ersatz in her cakes, no mock cream, and no management accountant telling her to shave 5 Yen here and 10 Yen there.

 

She also spent a year living in French Switzerland and knows how continental food should taste.

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